Friday, December 01, 2006

AIDS...



Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome....
AIDS for short.
A very small word that brings about a huge meaning, in what suffering is concerned.
People suffering from the disease are still fighting against the stigma, discrimination in society, in jobs, sometimes within their own families.
AIDS affects millions wordwide...and it will go on taking the lives of countless others.
It is urgent that the scientific community continues the research that will, one day, discover the cure for the disease.
In the meantime, governments and society, in general, must change their attitudes and no longer hide from the public eye the numbers and the faces of AIDS victims.
They need our support and love so that their fate doesn't seem so difficult. They need to be given some dignity and comfort, when death is inevitable.
AIDS was first reported June 5, 1981, when the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recorded a cluster of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in five homosexual men in Los Angeles. Originally dubbed GRID, or Gay-Related Immune Deficiency, health authorities soon realized that nearly half of the people identified with the syndrome were not homosexual men. In 1982, the CDC introduced the term AIDS to describe the newly recognized syndrome.
Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS ) is a collection of symptoms and infections in humans resulting from the specific damage to the immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The late stage of the condition leaves individuals prone to opportunistic infections and tumors. Although treatments for AIDS and HIV exist to slow the virus's progression, there is no known cure. HIV is transmitted through direct contact of a mucous membrane or the bloodstream with a bodily fluid containing HIV, such as blood, semen, vaginal fluid, preseminal fluid, and breast milk. This transmission can come in the form of anal, vaginal or oral sex, blood transfusion, contaminated hypodermic needles, exchange between mother and baby during pregnancy, childbirth, or breastfeeding, or other exposure to one of the above bodily fluids.
Most researchers believe that HIV originated in sub-Saharan Africa during the twentieth century; it is now a pandemic, with an estimated 38.6 million people now living with the disease worldwide. As of January 2006, the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS and the World Health Organization estimate that AIDS has killed more than 25 million people since it was first recognized on June 5, 1981, making it one of the most destructive epidemics in recorded history. In 2005 alone, AIDS claimed an estimated 2.4–3.3 million lives, of which more than 570,000 were children. A third of these deaths are occurring in sub-Saharan Africa, retarding economic growth and destroying human capital.
Antiretroviral treatment reduces both the mortality and the morbidity of HIV infection, but routine access to antiretroviral medication is not available in all countries. HIV/AIDS stigma is more severe than that associated with other life-threatening conditions and extends beyond the disease itself to providers and even volunteers involved with the care of people living with HIV.
The symptoms of AIDS are primarily the result of conditions that do not normally develop in individuals with healthy immune systems.
Most of these conditions are infections caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites that are normally controlled by the elements of the immune system that HIV damages. Opportunistic infections are common in people with AIDS. HIV affects nearly every organ system. People with AIDS also have an increased risk of developing various cancers such as Kaposi's sarcoma, cervical cancer and cancers of the immune system known as lymphomas.
Additionally, people with AIDS often have systemic symptoms of infection like
fevers, sweats (particularly at night), swollen glands, chills, weakness, and weight loss. After the diagnosis of AIDS is made, the current average survival time with antiretroviral therapy is estimated to be more than 5 years, but because new treatments continue to be developed and because HIV continues to evolve resistance to treatments, estimates of survival time are likely to continue to change. Without antiretroviral therapy, death normally occurs within a year. Most patients die from opportunistic infections or malignancies associated with the progressive failure of the immune system.
The specific opportunistic infections that AIDS patients develop depend in part on the prevalence of these infections in the geographic area in which the patient lives.
The majority of HIV infections are acquired through unprotected sexual relations between partners, one of whom has HIV. Sexual transmission occurs with the contact between sexual secretions of one partner with the rectal, genital or oral mucous membranes of another. Unprotected receptive sexual acts are riskier than unprotected insertive sexual acts, with the risk for transmitting HIV from an infected partner to an uninfected partner through unprotected insertive anal intercourse greater than the risk for transmission through vaginal intercourse or oral sex. Oral sex is not without its risks as HIV is transmissible through both insertive and receptive oral sex. The risk of HIV transmission from exposure to saliva is considerably smaller than the risk from exposure to semen; contrary to popular belief, one would have to swallow gallons of saliva from a carrier to run a significant risk of becoming infected.

6 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

I think yes. AIDS is a serious disease that must be controlled with an urgent cure. Like teacher said, this disease kill many people in all over the world (most of them are children), and this is very bad.
We can prevent this disease take some precautions, and in the same time don’t be racist and without discriminated nobody.

Genoveva Carvalho
nº14 11ºD

12:57 pm  
Anonymous Genoveva Carvalho Nº14 11ºD said...

I think yes. AIDS is a serious disease that must be controlled with an urgent cure. Like teacher said, this disease kill many people in all over the world (most of them are children), and this is very bad.
We can prevent this disease take some precautions, and in the same time don’t be racist and without discriminated nobody.

2:08 pm  
Blogger genoveva said...

I think yes. AIDS is a serious disease that must be controlled with an urgent cure. Like teacher said, this disease kill many people in all over the world (most of them are children), and this is very bad.
We can prevent this disease take some precautions, and in the same time don’t be racist and without discriminated nobody.

2:15 pm  
Anonymous Carla 11.ºD said...

HIV is a virus that attacks the organisms of some people. The ill infected by HIV become more and more feeble, fragile and he can contract several illness that lead to the death.
The AIDS is the fourth main cause of the mortality in the world. The infection for the HIV is transmissible. However, the forms of transmission are known, therefore, they can and must be avoided.

9:33 pm  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

HIV is a virus that attacks the organisms of some people. The ill infected by HIV become more and more feeble, fragile and he can contract several illness that lead to the death.
The AIDS is the fourth main cause of the mortality in the world. The infection for the HIV is transmissible. However, the forms of transmission are known, therefore, they can and must be avoided.

Carla N.º9 11.ºD

9:36 pm  
Anonymous Patrícia 11ºD said...

I totally agree with my colleagues.
More and more, it's necessary, people be aware of this cruel disease! I think that it's urgent scientists try to find the cure!

And people must be careful!

9:49 pm  

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